SET

SOMETIMES IN SEQUENCE, SOME TIMES IN SEQUINS

Oisín O’Brien 


Open 10am-6pm, 06/06-12/06

Closed Thursday 02/06 and Friday 03/06


 

Showing until Sunday June 12th. 

 

“I was just thinking that if football pitches make sense of how long things are, and blue whales point to how heavy stuff can be, then there must be something that relates to the different uses in the lifetime of a building. But I suppose, Elvis’s makes sense on stages. 

 

The exhibition is a barely, but still justifiable, attempt to replay the former council building in Woolwich, with a glitzier but also glitchier backing track. The varying stages of the career of Elvis Presley are drafted in as a wonky structure, to ponder whether the former council building’s use was like Elvis being conscripted into the army and if SET might be reflective of a teenage rebellion stage. 

 

Adapted from Sky Arts ‘The Seven Ages of Elvis’:

 

  1. Teenage Rebellion
  2. Army
  3. Hollywood Ham
  4. Comeback
  5. Washed Up Has Been
  6. Death

 

Within the space, a set of pointy hand signs (also known as manicules - ☛) get a night off from directing people to the bathrooms or smoking areas and exit their responsibilities. Whilst at the same time, a series of floaty texts are on hand like half-inflated armbands, to help navigate around the weird internal logics.”  Oisín O’Brien 

 

Oisín O’Brien is an Irish artist based between London and Dublin. His practice pokes and prods at what people do when free to choose anything from anything at all. It is a quest for making sense of being in, and of, the world. He is curious as to what draws people to activities or how they end up doing them. Such as going along to something with a friend, to having read about it or to it just being local.

 

Part of O’Brien’s intrigue stems from wanting to make sense of why you would want to be an artist and the anxieties around putting ideas and things into the world. Particularly of interest are the gestures and objects people use to help them swap roles in their lives; the hat his grandfather would put on (to then take off) for church and the one he would put on for his woodwork hobby.